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Inside Radiate Digital Services Tech and Software

Setting Up a Temporary URL on Magento (and Fixing Related Errors)

 there was one issue we kept running into Setting Up a Temporary URL on Magento (and Fixing Related Errors)

Magento is a great online e-commerce platform.

In fact, it’s our personal favorite.  But when we started using it, there was one issue we kept running into.  You see, for some reason, Magneto doesn’t always play nice with temporary URLs (or “temporary domains” if that’s your bag).

If you’re not ready to launch a website into the wide-open internet, temp URLs provide a great way to have the website online without it actually being “live”.

Thankfully, we have the situation pretty locked down these days.  So for those who are having troubles with their own Magento sites, we are here to help!

How To Set Up a Temporary URL on Magento

The first thing you have to do is install Magento.  When you’re installing it, we recommend you click the box that says “Use mod_rewrite”.

One you have that in place, go to your cPanel and click on phpMyAdmin.  Once you’re there select your Magento site on the left hand column (should have mgnt in it) and find the file called “core_config_data”.

Click on it.

From here, you’ll need to edit lines 6 and 7.  Replace the sites URL in the “value” field with your temporary domain.  (Our temporary domains are typically http://[IP-address]/ cPanelusername/)

Finally, go back to your cPanel and select the File Manager.  Go to public_html/var/cache and delete all of the interior contents.  Once that is done, go to your temp address, and you should be seeing a very plain-but-functional Magento page!

Either that or you’re seeing some image errors or experiencing 404s.  If that’s the case, don’t worry.  There’s still hope!

404s? Can’t Access the Admin Panel?

 there was one issue we kept running into Setting Up a Temporary URL on Magento (and Fixing Related Errors)

If you’re having trouble accessing the temporary address, it’s possible you entered it incorrectly.

Revisit the core_config_data file and check the address.  Make sure you started it with http:// and make sure you end the address with a forward slash ( / ).  If you missed doing one of those things, correct it, delete the var/cache files again, and try the temporary address again.

Still Not Working?

This step hasn’t always proven necessary, but it’s worked for us in the past.  Go back to the core_config_data file and find the line that says web/seo/use_rewrites.  If its value is currently 1, trying changing it to 0.

Save it, return to file manager, clear the var/cache files, and try your address.

Hopefully everything looks in order, and you can access the admin panel.

If you’ve had other errors with temporary Magento URLs, and/or you have figured out different ways to fix them, we’d love to hear about it.  Just share in the comments below!

Did we help solve your problems?

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Design Inside Radiate Digital

Why is There a Smiley Face in My WordPress Footer?

When you’re managing a website, one of the last things you want to see is an anomaly.  Little glitches or artifacts that show up, ruining your otherwise beautiful creation.

But when you’re dealing with code strewn across the worldwide web, it’s bound to happen everyone once and awhile.

Not too long ago, I noticed the tiniest of smiley faces show up in one of our website’s footers.  Shortly after that, one of our web developers noticed it as well.  Being the engineer of the site, he was much more upset than I was about the situation.

Where did this come from?

Had we been hacked?

Was it aliens?

 one of the last things you want to see is an anomaly Why is There a Smiley Face in My WordPress Footer?

These were all questions we asked.  Being the go to researcher of the team (it’s practically what my college degree is in), I was tasked with discovering the source of the “anomaly”.  It didn’t take long to find the answer.

And once I did, I realized that I was the cause of this tiny little smiley face.

What’s Causing the Smiley Face on My WordPress Site?

In addition to the endless third party plug-ins and support available for WordPress users, the WordPress organization itself offers a plethora of optional tools.  One set of tools that comes pre-installed with your site is a plug-in called Jetpack.

Jetpack has a variety of functions it can perform for people who choose to activate it.  It’s free to use too!  All you need to do is assign it to a WordPress.org account.  What I have found to be the most useful of the Jetpack tools is a little thing called Site Stats.

Site Stats is great because it operates like a simplified version of Google Analytics right on your WordPress dashboard.  You can quickly track page views, keyword searches, daily traffic, monthly traffic, social media traffic, and more!

I use it for all of our marketing clients to regularly check their blog activity.

What I didn’t know is that by activating the tool, you enable this tiny little smiley face that pops up in your footer.  Why does it pop up?  They say the image helps gather analytics, but that the product “should work fine without it”.

I’m not entirely sure what that means, but basically, you don’t need it to be there.  It just is.  Like some little joke.  Our developer did not find it funny.

Not at all.

 one of the last things you want to see is an anomaly Why is There a Smiley Face in My WordPress Footer?

So How Do I Get Rid of It?

Turns out this is a very common issue people run into, and because of that, there are a lot of different ways to solve it.  You can even download plug-ins that are designed to mask it.  However, there’s a much easier solution.  You simply deactivate it.

Here’s how you do that:

1. Go to your admin panel (or dashboard if you would).

2. Click on Jetpack in the left hand column.

3. On the page, go to the WordPress.com Stats box and click configure.

4. Go to where it says “Smiley” and click the box that says “Hide the states smiley face”.

5. Save the configuration, and you are good to go!

Easy, right?  As I said, if for some reason you don’t like that option, there are other ways to do it.  You can even edit the CSS of the smiley face, making it bigger or smaller.  I’m not entirely sure why you would want to do that, but hey, some people are in to weird things.

We hope this helps you in your endeavors.  At the very least, you learned something today.

 one of the last things you want to see is an anomaly Why is There a Smiley Face in My WordPress Footer?

Have you ever had an unexplained glitch or anomaly show up on your website?  What was the cause?  How did you fix it?